Sunday, March 31, 2019

Preparing for Classes, RIP RP, and Hay Nets


I've been working a small project for an introduction to felting class tomorrow in Minneapolis. I want to use wool from my own flock, so I picked this beautiful black shetland combed top. I don't have much left since I've sold all but two of my Shetlands -- and they aren't black. Anyway, this little tablet pouch only took 3/4 ounce of combed top.

I added some pieces of felt from a rug I cut up and some scraps of Margilan silk. I think this felt would make some beautiful scarves or even a jacket.

So today it's back to the drawing board, I think I will switch to Shetland Mule and Teeswater cross top. I want more stability for a felted tablet pouch or hot pad or coasters.



I'm teaching a new class at Shepherd's Harvest, knitting with longwool locks.
It's only a 3 hour class, no water or towels or plastic bags involved in making this wooly locks scarf, boa, cowl or cuffs. I will be washing up lots of  my Teeswater cross locks so I'll have plenty on hand. Registration starts April 1st.


I'm also teaching the felted fleece class in August in Minneapolis at the American Swedish Institute.  I'm hoping for good weather, we'll be working out in their beautiful courtyard for the wet portion of the class.
I'm pretty sure there are still openings in my classes in Hanover, PA in June and September too. Sherry Tenney is taking registrations on Etsy for those. Last year's class was so much fun and Sherry's selection of the raw fleeces was fabulous!
My felted fleece class at North House Folk School is full but they are taking names for the waiting list. I also teach occasional classes in my home studio by appointment, just shoot me an email and we can talk about it.

We said goodbye to  our dear Richard Parker last week. He lived a long life for a cat diagnosed with Feline Leukemia and Feline Immunodeficiency Virus. He was the fearless defender of our realm.

Okay, now for a sheep photo,look at those sweet little Gotland faces.
I've skirted all 33 of my fleeces this year and even washed 4 or them already. I will be making lots of felt pelts from my own flock thanks to using HayChix hay nets this year. I have to feed hay year round because we are in the woods here, not much pasture. My fleeces were noticeably cleaner this year. I use the big round nets and the small nets for feeding small squares and flakes. Love them! 


2 comments:

  1. I keep seeing these bags, but I'm concerned about sheep sticking feet into them... Did you have any trouble with that?

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    Replies
    1. Oh sorry I didn't see this comment until just now! No, the sheep haven't gotten their feet stuck in the nets, but I did have one wether who managed to get all tangled up in a mini net that I didn't tie tightly enough. He got his head in there and one foot trapped. He rolled down the hill through the snow and I when I came out I saw a big furry lump at the bottom of the hill. I got him untangled and he was fine. But it could have been much worse. After that I started tying the small nets to a fence so they weren't on the ground. That helped make them easier to find in the morning too. When my big rounds get down to just a hump, I open it up and let the sheep eat the center. That's the dangerous part, but there's still a lot of hay in there. Then we pull the net and flip the remaining hay over and the eat some more. With 26 sheep in that pen a big round lasts about 8 days. With 8 wethers a big round lasts a whole month.

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Lambs on the Way! And chicks, poults and ducklings.

Well, we will have some lambs after all. And they're due right when I'll be out of town teaching up at North House. It was a cold a...